It’s the small things

So far the People’s History of Pop has seen everything from rare acetates to superstars’ wardrobes. But it’s often the small things that have evoked the fondest memories. Of all the items in their collection, many of our contributors have said they’d save the oddities of their hoard first in the event of an imaginary fire.

Items as seemingly incongruous as an old beer can, a handful of orange confetti and a plastic bag have been hailed as the jewel in a crown of pop paraphernalia. They are souvenirs with no price tag, reminders of triumphant acquisitions; of catching Ray Davies’ half-finished drink, of experiencing the Pet Shop Boys’ live for the first time, and of buying that first single in a long-departed local record store.

Here are a few of our favourite obscurities:

Caught in a frenzy by Chris Vanezis a the Smith's farewell gig at Wolverhampton Civic Hall in 1988
A piece of Mozza’s shirt: Caught in a frenzy by Chris Vanezis a the Smith’s farewell gig at Wolverhampton Civic Hall in 1988
Alice Cooper paper knickers: Saved from the School's Out! album in 1972 by Angela Tomlinson. Presumably unworn...
Alice Cooper paper knickers: Saved from the School’s Out! album in 1972 by Angela Tomlinson. Presumably unworn…
Ray Davies' lager can: Caught by Terry Cawser a Kinks gig in Ipswich in the mid-1970s
Ray Davies’ lager can: Caught by Terry Cawser a Kinks gig in Ipswich in the mid-1970s
Stuck to the underwear of a Pet Shop Boys fan, this confetti is a reminder of a great gig
Stuck to the underwear of a Pet Shop Boys fan, this confetti is a reminder of a great gig

If you have a music souvenir that’s more curious than costly share it with us at www.phop.co.uk

British B-Boys be rockin’ on and on

We love this photograph uploaded to the People’s History of Pop by Martin Jones. It features the Wolverhampton B Boys Breakdance Crew in 1985 with their trophy from an ‘All Dayer’ dance event.

Can you spot the Drum and Bass legend in the photograph?

Wolverhampton B Boys breakdance crew, 1985, featuring Goldie. Uploaded by MMJones29. Licence: Copyright (c) all rights reserved
Wolverhampton B Boys breakdance crew, 1985. Uploaded by MMJones29. Licence: Copyright (c) all rights reserved

 

Check out this great video of the Wolverhampton B Boys battling Coventry rivals Future Shock on children’s television show Saturday Starship in November 1984.

Fun Fact: The classic B-boy track ‘The Mexican’ was originally recorded by the British prog rock band Babe Ruth.  It is considered by some as one of the most influential songs in hip-hop and breakdancing culture.

You can read more about the track in the The Stories Behind the Songs article published in Classic Rock Magazine in May 2012.

Were you a breakdancer in the 1980s or 1990s? Upload your story to PHOP.CO.UK

Scrapbook Stars

Every British pop star has had their career recorded meticulously by the press, in autobiographies and across social media. But as well as the articles and documentaries, the wax works and plaques, these stars have been immortalised in Pritt Stick.

Stuck between dog-eared pages, everyone from the Beatles to the Spice Girls have been lovingly documented by their biggest fans in scrapbooks. The People’s History of Pop has seen some wonderful creations uploaded to the site, demonstrating just how cherished these musicians were.

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David Bowie fan Linda first saw him live in 1973, the concert where Bowie announced the retirement of the Ziggy character. As the entire Hammersmith Apollo screamed “Don’t go, David!” Linda resolved to begin her scrapbook so she had something to remember him by, something to cling on to. She wasn’t to know he would soon return as the Thin White Duke.

 

 

download (1)Throughout the 1980’s and ‘90s Lisa Redford kept magazine cuttings all about her favourite pop star, Morrissey. At the height of the Brit Pop era, Lisa collected Morrissey fanzines and records. Music was a big deal to her and her friends; the 1990’s were a celebratory period where there was real passion for the bands and the music they created.

 

If you still have your pop music scrapbook we’d love to see it. To share your story just visit www.phop.co.uk or email phop@7wonder.co.uk