British B-Boys be rockin’ on and on

We love this photograph uploaded to the People’s History of Pop by Martin Jones. It features the Wolverhampton B Boys Breakdance Crew in 1985 with their trophy from an ‘All Dayer’ dance event.

Can you spot the Drum and Bass legend in the photograph?

Wolverhampton B Boys breakdance crew, 1985, featuring Goldie. Uploaded by MMJones29. Licence: Copyright (c) all rights reserved
Wolverhampton B Boys breakdance crew, 1985. Uploaded by MMJones29. Licence: Copyright (c) all rights reserved

 

Check out this great video of the Wolverhampton B Boys battling Coventry rivals Future Shock on children’s television show Saturday Starship in November 1984.

Fun Fact: The classic B-boy track ‘The Mexican’ was originally recorded by the British prog rock band Babe Ruth.  It is considered by some as one of the most influential songs in hip-hop and breakdancing culture.

You can read more about the track in the The Stories Behind the Songs article published in Classic Rock Magazine in May 2012.

Were you a breakdancer in the 1980s or 1990s? Upload your story to PHOP.CO.UK

People’s History of Pop – Episode One

PHOP-EPISODE1-TXCARDFINALCROP

Don’t forget to watch Episode One of the People’s History of Pop which will broadcast on Friday 15th April at 9PM on BBC 4. The programme will be available to watch on iPlayer shortly after broadcast.

Here is a clip from Episode One featuring Rolling Stones fan John Phillpot.

We are still crowdsourcing for the People’s History of Pop website and want to see your stuff. Upload your tickets stubs, photographs, records, teen band recording, memorabilia and more at PHOP.CO.UK

Episode One of People’s History of Pop – how to watch it!

Copyright BBC - Photographer: Ray Burmiston
Twiggy will present the first episode of PHOP. Copyright: BBC. Photographer: Ray Burmiston

The first episode of the People’s History of Pop is to be broadcast on BBC Four at 9pm on April 15 2016, as part of the year-long My Generation season.

Starting with the fifties, the season celebrates the history of pop music through the decades. Over four special weekends across the year, pop stars and music fans alike will give their own perspectives in this major season of tailored programming and content across the BBC. The stars at the centre of the pop scene and the people who loved the music will celebrate a given decade, with BBC Two focusing on the musicians’ reminiscences of the time and BBC Four telling the stories of those years through the fans’ experiences and memories in the ‘People’s History of Pop’.

We’ve interviewed those who have uploaded their stuff to the online People’s History of Pop project to make a film telling the fans’ stories from the decade 1955-1965.

Episode one will be presented by Sixties fashion icon Twiggy (to be broadcast on Friday 15 April). The programme will celebrate the decade in which we created our very own pop culture. It hears from skiffle players, fans of The Shadows, Liverpudlians who frequented the Cavern at the height of Merseybeat, Beatles devotees, dancers on Ready, Steady, Go!, mods, lovers of ska, bluebeat and Millie Small, and fans of The Rolling Stones.

Twiggy says: “I’m so excited to be taking part in the People’s History of Pop and telling the story of all that pop music meant to us in the Fifties and Sixties. This series is seen through the eyes of music fans, from lovers of skiffle to rock ‘n’ roll, pop to ska, and rhythm and blues to folk… it’s the precious music we all cherished, danced to and went giddy over. And music can evoke such strong memories. In fact, I can remember like it was yesterday, being one of those screaming girls at a Beatles concert. At age 13, I went with a friend to see them at Finsbury Park Astoria. My lovely Dad was going to pick us up afterwards, but at the end of the show we went to the stage door to try and see the group and so I wasn’t where I said I would be, and Dad couldn’t find us. He was frantic with worry but eventually found us and drove us safely home. It was a night I will never forget.”

Stories uncovered in episode one include a young Lonnie Donegan fan asking Lonnie back to his mate’s parents’ house so they could have an impromptu skiffle jam – and he said yes; what it was like to go to a recording of legendary music show Ready, Steady, Go!; and a schoolgirl’s dream comes true when The Beatles turn up at the pub where her mum was a waitress – but will her mum drag her out of school to meet her heroes?

Unearthed pop treasures include a recording of John Lennon’s first-ever recorded performance with his band The Quarrymen, at a fete in Liverpool on the day he met Paul McCartney for the first time – which viewers will see Twiggy listening to at the legendary Abbey Road studios; rare acetates of Merseyside musicians recorded by Percy Phillips (who also first recorded The Quarrymen once Paul and George Harrison had joined) in his living room in Liverpool; and Please Please Me in stereo – from a very rare pressing uploaded by a contributor.